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    Travel Ideas for 2013

    If the Internet is to be believed (and when has the Internet ever been known to lie to anyone?), there's a good chance the world is coming to an end on Friday. Now, here at the Auto Europe headquarters we put little faith in such claims, for two very good reasons. First, because ending the world on a Friday would be monstrously unfair, and while monstrously unfair is the stuff Murphy's Law is made of, there's no way the Universe would want to accumulate so many bad karma points so quickly. Second, because NASA says there's no way the world is coming to an end on Friday, and we like to stick with Science where such things are concerned. As such, since we've established that barring the zombie apocalypse or an alien invasion there's no way the world is ending on Friday, we think it only fair to start exploring our travelling possibilities for next year. Here are a few suggestions for places where you can wear your new 'I've been to the apocalypse and all I got was this lousy t-shirt' t-shirt in 2013

    Easter Island, Chile - Nothing says little green men from space quite like the Easter Island's Maoi. These extraordinary - if slightly creepy - stone statues were build sometime between the 13th and 16th centuries and are easily recognizable by their over-sized heads and eerie eyes that gaze dreamingly into the sky. Theories about how these huge statues were erected - the largest is almost 10m high and weighs over 82 tons - vary greatly, from reports about how the Rapa Nui people used intricate systems of pulleys and sledges to transport and erect the statues, to 'aliens did it.'

    The Great Pyramid of Giza, Egypt - Sometimes it feels like ancient civilizations' sole purpose in building over-sized monuments was to puzzle future generations as to how exactly they did it. The Great Pyramid is the oldest of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World, and the only one to survive to present day. That's quality craftsmanship if I ever saw it. The Great Pyramid also managed to remain the tallest structure in the world for almost four millennia, making it another popular object of 'aliens did it' conspiracy theories. Egyptian pyramids in general, and the Great Pyramid of Giza in particular, remain objects of fascinations and draw thousands of tourists every year (though it's probably sensible to wait until the political situation in the area stabilizes before popping in for a visit...)

    Machu Pichu, Peru - Pre-Colombian civilizations are all the rage these days, what with the theories that the Mayans predicted the world would end on December 21st 2012 (cause we all know that the last page of a calendar must surely signify the end of times). Machu Pichu is arguably the most famous pre-Colombian city in the American continent and was built by the Incas sometime during the 15th century. Due to its location and the Spanish conquistadores' lack of sense of direction, the city managed to remain below the radar until the early 20th century. This led to the city being spared much of the sacking and looting suffered by other cities of the same period. When it was discovered, Machu Pichu was extremely well preserved and extensive restoration work has been conducted since in order to give visitors a better idea of what the city would have looked like in its prime. Nowadays, Machu Pichu is one of the most popular tourist attractions in Peru.

    Stonehenge, UK - You don't need to travel to the other side of the world in order to find something both cool and eerie. Right here in our backyard, Stonehenge is one of the UK's most mysterious attractions (along with the monster of the Loch Ness, but with actual photographic evidence of its existence..). Although theories abound, no one knows exactly when Stonehenge was built - though it pre-dates recorded history; why it was built - though astronomical observatory and religious site are popular options; nor how it was built - though 'aliens did it' is high on the polls. The stones are roped off for most of the year, but visitors can still walk around them at a short distance. However, if you prefer to take a closer look, access is granted by English Heritage four times a year: on the summer and winter solstice, and on the spring and autumn equinox.

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